If tomorrow were Thursday instead of today, it would be the earliest date Thanksgiving Day could fall. This year, with Thanksgiving Day falling on the 28th (the fourth Thursday of November) that makes it the latest date the holiday can occur. This means, among other things, that Black Friday (the day that consumers supposedly push retailers from the red side of their collective ledgers into the black side of their collective ledgers) is also as late as it can be. This results in a shorter Winter Holidays’ shopping season and probably explains all the “Black Friday” sales already taking place. I was amazed. No. Perhaps “dumbfounded” would be a better word, to see that Black Friday now appears on my Google calendar as a “real” holiday. Speaking of Black Friday, the library will be open as per usual on the Friday following Thanksgiving. We do encourage everyone to make it a Read (pronounced “red”) Friday by coming in and checking out some books or getting comfortable somewhere in our cozy library and reading a book or a magazine or newspaper or brochure or anything with print on it. Speaking of reading, the Winter Reading Program will start on Monday, Dec. 16. If you want to start training for the Winter Reading Program, a November Reading Program is currently underway. Use your Beanstack app to access it or you can go to deforestlibrary.beanstack.org and find the program, “November Reads.” Speaking of reading, which leads me to speaking of books, below you will find some of the recent titles which recently appeared at our library. Enjoy!

New Arrivals

Non-Fiction

“The Hidden World of the Fox” by Adele Brand. A mammal ecologist’s intimate portrait of the fox draws on scientific research in multiple countries to share insights into the species’ evolution, its highly adaptable nature and the cultural history it has inspired.

“Morning Glory on the Vine: Early Songs and Drawings” by Joni Mitchell. A full-color compendium of Joni Mitchell’s handwritten lyrics and drawings, originally handcrafted as a gift for a select group of friends in 1971, is now available to the public for the first time.

“Crusaders: The Epic History of the Wars for the Holy Lands” by Dan Jones. The best-selling author of “The Templars” presents a wide-ranging, narrative history of the Crusades that examines eighth-century Christian-Muslim relations from the perspectives of diverse people on all sides of the wars.

“Thomas Jefferson’s Education” by Alan Taylor. From a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian comes a study of Thomas Jefferson’s campaign to save Virginia through education.

“The Queens of Animation: The Untold Story of the Women Who Transformed the World of Disney and Made Cinematic History” by Nathalia Holt. The best-selling author of “Rise of the Rocket Girls” draws on extensive research to trace the role of women employees at Walt Disney Studios, who endured sexism, domestic abuse and workplace intimidation to create iconic films.

“How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems” by Randall Munroe. The creator of the web comic xkcd and best-selling author of “What If?” and Thing Explainer shares inadvisable advice for responding to today’s problems, from using social-media for weather forecasts to powering a home by destroying the fabric of space-time.

Fiction

“Warrior of the Altaii” by Robert Jordan. A previously unpublished novel by the late best-selling author of the Wheel of Time series finds the leader of the Altaii people reaching out to a visitor from another world to save his people from environmental hazards and dangerous adversaries.

“When Christmas Comes, No. 20 (Thomas Kincade’s Cape Light)” by Katherine Spencer. Returning to Angel Island to celebrate Thanksgiving with her family, Liza Merrit reunites with her close friend, Claire, before the deterioration of her inn and a surprise party for a neighbor’s 90th birthday lead to unexpected choices.

“The 19th Christmas, No. 19 (Women’s Murder Club)” by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro. A peaceful San Francisco holiday season is shattered by a criminal mastermind’s ominous threats for Christmas morning, prompting Detective Lindsay Boxer and her friends to prepare for an attack by a commissioned army of criminals.

“Dachshund Through the Snow, No. 20 (Andy Carpenter)” by David Rosenfelt. Wanting to grant the selfless Christmas wishes of a child in need, lawyer Andy Carpenter and his wife track down the boy’s father, who has been arrested for a murder that his family swears he did not commit.

“A Catered New Year’s Eve, No.15 (Mystery With Recipes)”by Isis Crawford. Sisters Bernie and Libby are contacted by a long-estranged family member, who asks for their help uncovering the truth about the suspicious long-ago deaths of their father and his business partner. By the author of “A Catered Cat Wedding.”

“A Cruel Deception, No. 11 (Bess Crawford)” by Charles Todd. A religious nurse struggles to save a troubled World War I soldier form a mysterious killer while navigating difficult choices about her own future. By the best-selling author of the Inspector Ian Rutledge mysteries.

“Child’s Play” by Danielle Steel. Enduring her late husband’s death by embracing strict self-discipline to secure her career and the prospects of her children, a prestigious Manhattan attorney is confronted by astonishing secrets and an out-of-wedlock baby.

If you would care to reserve any of these titles, give us a call at 846-5482 and have your library card handy! The library is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Can’t make it in when we’re open? Call and ask about our electronic locker system

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