Beta Upsilon chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi

The Beta Upsilon chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi enjoys an afternoon at Gracie’s Owl Club, 5847 County Highway N. In the photo from 1956-57 is professor Harold James, known as “Dean” James, who was the advisor to the fraternity.

Homecoming 2015, sponsored by the Milton College Preservation Society, will be held on Saturday, Sept. 12, at Main Hall, 513 College St.

Scheduled events begin at 10 a.m. with a reunion of the Beta Upsilon Chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi in the lower level of Main Hall. An officer from the National Alpha Sigma Phi will be in attendance and attendees have already registered from Ohio, Georgia, Illinois and Wisconsin.

At 2 p.m. a program in the chapel of Main Hall will recognize those attending and crown the 2015 homecoming king and queen. A presentation will be made by Milton College Preservation Society board president and author Doug Welch, on the publication of his recent book, “The History of Milton College Football.”

Tailgating will begin at 4 p.m. Bring a dish to pass and a beverage. Brats, hot dogs and buns will be provided. Registration is required by contacting mainhall@miltoncollege.org or (608) 868-2354.

Other activities will include a silent auction and refreshments from 1 to 3 p.m.

In addition to the regular exhibits in Main Hall, vintage photos will be on display.

FRATERNITY REUNION TO COINCIDE WITH HOMECOMING

Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity has about 5,000 undergraduate brothers and 52,000 living alumni. The nation’s 10th oldest fraternity was founded in1845 at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. Its purpose is to “Better the Man, through the creation and perpetuation of brotherhood founded upon the values of character Silence, Charity, Purity, Honor, Patriotism.”

On the Milton College campus, the Alpha Eta chapter of Alpha Kappa Pi (chartered in 1940) became the Beta Upsilon chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi in 1946. The 1948-49 Fides yearbook reports the consolidation did much to strengthen the fraternity.

George Lake, a brother who died in France on Aug. 2, 1944 (during World War II) and was a member of Company B, 110th Infantry Regiment, was memorialized in 1949 with a drinking fountain outside Main Hall.

In 1969 the chapter purchased a house at 734 East Madison Ave. The first house owned by a fraternity on campus has since been torn down.

The chapter won 1969-70 and 1963-64 Summa Cum Laude Awards and the 1969 Tomahawk Award. The chapter’s newsletter, “By-Line,” won the Fraternity’s Chapter Newsletter Award in 1970. Dr. David D. Heenan, Beta Upsilon ’42, William A. Jambrek, Beta Upsilon ’59, and James G. Kirkwood, Beta Upsilon ’67, have received the Delta Beta Xi Award.

As enrollment fell, the charter was withdrawn. Judy Scheehle, administrator/curator of the Milton College Preservation Society, reports by 1977, there were no fraternities or sororities on campus.

The Beta Upsilon chapter roll contains the names of 411 men of which 176 are living today.

FOOTBALL HISTORY BOOK WILL BE UNVEILED

By Susan Angell

Managing Editor

People attending Milton College’s 2015 reunion will be introduced to a recently published book that highlights the college’s renowned football team.

“The History of Milton College Football” was edited by Doug Welch, who serves as the Milton College Preservation Society’s board president.

The 120-page book is fresh off the press, and Welch says you don’t have to be a football fan to enjoy it.

“Football isn’t the most important thing Milton College was known for,” said Welch. “But this book is a microcosm of how Milton College influenced the community. That’s true because so many of our community leaders down through the generations came to Milton because of Milton College. The Whitfords, Crandalls, Westlunds, Curlers and others. So, too, did a great many people in the area football community. People like Rudy Gaddini, Jerry Schliem, Evansville coach Ron Grovesteen and Edgerton coach Jack Gregory all came to the area because of Milton College football.”

The project was the brainchild of Welch and MCPS director Judy Scheehle.

An extensive accounting of the football team’s early years already existed. Tom Asleson, a 1959 graduate of Milton College, wrote about the team as part of his graduate school dissertation at Winona State University in Minnesota. Asleson covered the team through the 1966 season.

“We had that piece of work in our archives,” said Welch. “Judy suggested I finish Tom’s work by adding the 1967-1981 seasons.”

When Welch’s research was done, they thought the subject might have a broader appeal, and the idea of the book was born.

Welch, using the society’s extensive archives, began researching the school’s football team from 1966 through the college’s closing in 1982.

The book includes essays from six former football players, as well as chapters from three major players in the school’s football history: Milton resident and businessman Rudy Gaddini, who served as football coach in the 1970s; Evansville High School’s football coach Ron Grovesteen, who was quarterback in the 1960s, and quarterback Dave Krieg, who played at Milton College in the 1970s and went on to play professional football in the National Football League.

“The essays are humorous and filled with anecdotes,” said Welch.

The book’s foreword is written by Dave Wedeward of Edgerton, who is a Milton College graduate and covered Milton College sports extensively during his years as sports editor of the Janesville Gazette.

“It’s been a two-year project,” said Welch. “It was a cool project to do. Readers will learn about the community, and the college’s role in the community.”

Contributions from the community to offset the cost of printing were generous, Welch said.

The book was printed this week, and will be officially unveiled at the Milton College reunion celebration. Welch will give a presentation on the book at 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12.

The book is available for $20 at Dave’s Ace Hardware, Main Hall on the college campus, and Northleaf Winery.

“This is a must-read for any area football fan,” Welch said. “In it you’ll find a lot of familiar names you never realized had a connection to Milton College. I think it makes a lot of those connections.

“It was a time unto itself.”

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