March Good Reads

Discover a new favorite book with the Sun Prairie Public Library’s March Good Reads. This month’s list features a variety of topics for readers to find something new. Good Reads are available for checkout at the Sun Prairie Public Library, 1350 Linnerud Drive.

Fiction

This Is How It Always Is

By Laurie Frankel 

Frankel’s novel is about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. It’s about the ways this is how it always is: Change is always hard and miraculous and hard again, parenting is always a leap into the unknown with crossed fingers and full hearts, children grow but not always according to plan. Rosie and Penn want Claude to be whoever Claude wants to be. They’re just not sure they’re ready to share that with the world. Soon the entire family is keeping Claude’s secret. Until one day it explodes. This is how children change…and then change the world.

 

Burning Bright

By Nick Petrie 

Lee Child writes, “Lots of characters get compared to my own Jack Reacher, but Petrie’s Peter Ash is the real deal.” War veteran Peter Ash sought peace and quiet among the towering redwoods of northern California, but the trip isn’t quite the balm he’d hoped for. The dense forest and close fog cause his claustrophobia to buzz and spark, and then he stumbles upon a grizzly. Peter doesn’t favor his odds, so he makes a strategic retreat up a nearby sapling. There, he finds something strange: a climbing rope, affixed to a distant branch above. It leads to another, and another, up through the giant tree canopy, and ending at a hanging platform. On the platform is a woman on the run. From below them come the sounds of men and gunshots.

 

The Animators: A Novel

By Kayla Rae Whitaker

Mel Vaught and Sharon Kisses are finally celebrating the release of their first full-length feature, which transforms Mel’s difficult childhood into a provocative and visually daring work of art. The toast of the indie film scene, they stand at the cusp of making it big. But with their success come doubt and destruction, cracks in their relationship threatening the delicate balance of their partnership. Sharon begins to feel expendable, suspecting that the ever-more raucous Mel is the real artist. During a trip to Sharon’s home state of Kentucky, the only other partner she has ever truly known—her troubled, charismatic childhood best friend, Teddy—reenters her life, and long-buried resentments rise to the surface, hastening a reckoning no one sees coming.

 

Non-fiction

Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town

By Brian Alexander

In 1947, Forbes magazine declared Lancaster, Ohio the epitome of the all-American town. Today it is damaged, discouraged, and fighting for its future. The Anchor Hocking Glass Company, once the world’s largest maker of glass tableware, was the base on which Lancaster’s society was built. With access to the company and its leaders, and Lancaster’s citizens, journalist Brian Alexander shows how financial engineering took hold in the 1980s, accelerated in the 21st Century, and wrecked the company. We follow CEO Sam Solomon, an African-American leading the nearly all-white town’s biggest private employer, as he tries to rescue the company from the New York private equity firm that hired him.

 

The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing

By Damion Searls

In 1917, working alone in a remote Swiss asylum, psychiatrist Hermann Rorschach devised an experiment to probe the human mind: a set of ten carefully designed inkblots. For years he had grappled with the theories of Freud and Jung while also absorbing the aesthetic movements of the day, from Futurism to Dadaism. A visual artist himself, Rorschach had come to believe that who we are is less a matter of what we say, as Freud thought, than what we see. Elegant and original, The Inkblots shines a light on the twentieth century’s most visionary synthesis of art and science.

 

Teen

The Hate U Give

By Angie Thomas

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Angie Thomas’s searing debut about an ordinary girl in extraordinary circumstances addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty. Soon to be a major motion picture from Fox 2000/Temple Hill Productions.

 

Children

The Warden’s Daughter

By Jerry Spinelli

From Newbery Medalist Jerry Spinelli comes a moving and memorable story of a girl searching for happiness inside the walls of a prison. Cammie O’Reilly lives at the Hancock County Prison­—not as a prisoner, but as the warden’s daughter. She spends the mornings hanging out with shoplifters and reformed arsonists in the women’s exercise yard, which gives Cammie a certain cache with her school friends. Her mother died saving her from harm when she was just a baby, and the thing Cammie most wants is a mom. A prison might not be the best place to search for a mother, but Cammie is determined and she’s willing to work with what she’s got.

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