There’s no doubt that the real stars at Sassy Cow Creamery are the cows.

They produce thousands of gallons of milk each year that gets made into beverages, ice cream, and cheeses.

So to celebrate, Sassy Cow Creamery just completed a 2,500 sq. ft. expansion of its farm store, adding a cafe that highlights its own line of cheeses with classic and signature grilled cheese sandwiches, along with salads, soups, and coffee drinks.

James Baerwolf, who owns the business with his brother Robert, said now families, school groups and other visitors can make the creamery a destination, with seasonal farm tours, a production viewing window where people can products being made, and then can sit down to a great meal.

“Number 1, we wanted to be accessible year-round and give visitors more to make sure that their trip out here is worthwhile,” James Baerwolf said, noting that the business is attracting more visitors as the Sun Prairie area’s population grows.

The new Farmhouse Kitchen menu includes classic grilled cheese sandwiches made with Sassy Cow cheddar, butterkase, muenster, and Havarti. Signature grilled cheese sandwiches, made with Beans n Cream Bakehouse bread, include a turkey melt, pizza melt, and bacon jalapeño poppers. All sandwiches, priced from $6.95-$10.95, include a side and unlimited milk from the barn.

Last year, Sassy Cow launched its own cheese line made by award-winning artisans at Cedar Grove Cheese in Plain, Wisconsin.

When asked what’s his favorite grilled cheese sandwich, Baerwolf gave an easy answer: “They are all good because they all start with Sassy Cow Creamery milk.”

A farmhouse salad, soups, and Collectivo coffee drinks round out the new Farmhouse Kitchen menu. One of the staff favorites is the affogato--a scoop of salted caramel or another flavor ice cream — surrounded in espresso.

There’s also a new inside kids play area, and come summer, there will again be calves outside in their pen for petting.

Sassy Cow Creamery on Bristol Road offers behind-the-scenes Friday farm tours from June to August that includes the milking parlor, and ice cream making and milk bottling operation. The farm has 600 traditional cows and 300 organic cows and has 30-40 employees in its operations and retail departments.

Baerwolf says thousands of school kids come out to the farm during the summer for tours.

“The cows always take center stage,” he said. “The kids could care less about the shiny metal in the production area but when there is a little calf out there, that is what they like.”

Sassy Cow owners James and Robert Baerwolf are the third generation to run the farm that produces both organic and traditional milk.

The company is an important part of the state’s dairy farm heritage. Wisconsin is home to 23 percent of the nation’s dairy farms and 95 percent are family-owned.

With thousands of gallons of milk produced daily, there’s plenty of products that line the freezers and refrigerators of the new expanded on-site store. Baerwolf said the company’s milk is the most popular product. This year Sassy Cow Creamery launched lactose-free milk and expanded into school milk sales.

Visitors can also try more than 50 flavors of premium ice creams—-blue moon, salted caramel, strawberry, and blueberry cheesecake, to just name a few, plus special seasonal favorites.

“We really want people who visit Sassy Cow to learn about our farm and know where their food is coming from, Baerwolf says. “They can come and see how we make the best product possible.”

Sassy Cow Creamery is located at W4192 Bristol Road, Columbus, WI; find out more at sassycowcreamery.com

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